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HP unveils powerhouse ultrabooks


Johannesburg, 14 May 2012
Read time 2min 00sec

HP's newly merged printing and personal systems group has rolled out more than 80 products, 20 of which are ultrabooks, notebooks, workstations and printers aimed at the enterprise, SME and consumer markets.

The HP Spectre XT, HP Envy ultrabooks and sleekbooks, as well as HP's business range of EliteBook Folios took centre stage at the Global Influencer Summit 2012, held in Shanghai last week.

The Spectre XT Pro, which is HP's ultrabook flagship, includes Microsoft Windows 7 Professional, CoolSense technology and embedded security that protects data in e-mails and on the solid state drive. It combines the entertainment and multimedia features seen in the Envy ultrabooks with the business features of the EliteBook Folio.

All of HP's latest notebooks and ultrabooks come with Beats Audio, the result of a partnership between HP and Beats by Dr Dre. HP also decided to preload software onto the HP Spectre ultrabook, including Adobe Photoshop Elements 10, Absolute Data Protect, two years' of Norton Internet Security and Intel Identity Protection.

Steve Hoffman, VP and chief of staff, HP printing and personal systems group, said the tech giant will be driving its ultrabooks aggressively into the global IT market and pointed out that China is its biggest market in terms of PC shipments, despite only operating in the market for 27 years.

Hoffman explained that HP has designed a customised range of ultrabook and notebook products to suit the needs of every kind of end-user.

“HP's new printing and personal computer systems group operates at a tremendous scale, at $65 billion, and, on unit shipment basis, has shipped more than 120 million devices, which equates to four devices shipped per second globally,” said Hoffman.

He added: “By 2015, the number of PC shipments will increase globally to reach 2.3 billion units; this adds up to more than $300 billion of potential revenue.

“Market share should never be the ultimate objective; rather, it should be the result of doing things well, and we will continue to define the markets in which we compete in.”

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