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You’re not resilient if you don’t have WAR


Johannesburg, 02 Oct 2019
Read time 2min 50sec
Innes le Roux, GM: Resilient Office Services, ContinuitySA
Innes le Roux, GM: Resilient Office Services, ContinuitySA

In today’s volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous world, smart organisations are focusing on building resilience into their corporate DNA. Resilience implies the ability to adapt to changing circumstances, and to recover quickly when a disaster strikes – even one that is unexpected and unplanned for. An effective resilience programme will cover people, processes and technology, but the necessity for a work-area recovery (or WAR) capability should never be ignored.

This is because when a disaster makes it impossible to use one or more of the organisation’s primary sites, it is very important to have somewhere for staff to work.

“Technology developments like the cloud, and the widespread use of sophisticated mobile devices, mean that some members of staff can continue to be productive from home for a limited period, but many jobs require in-person collaboration and supervision,” says Innes le Roux, GM: Resilient Office Services, ContinuitySA. “Specialised areas like treasury and call centres also cannot operate in isolation.

“Work-area recovery thus remains a key element of any business continuity and resilience plan.”

Work-area recovery can be defined as a secure, alternative environment that can be ready to receive a stipulated number of an organisation’s employees at very short notice. It will have desks, PCs, telephone systems and ICT connectivity all in place, along with canteen and other facilities needed by staff. Typically, the WAR would be located at the premises of a specialist business continuity provider so there would be plenty of support staff with all the experience needed to get employees productive in the least possible time.

This would include the all-important task of linking the WAR to the organisation’s backup data and applications. Today, all organisations are dependent on their ICT systems and data, so it’s very important not only that they have a recovery site, but understand how to bring their systems back up in the WAR with minimal delay. Again, experienced business continuity professionals can spell the difference between success and failure.

Many companies take the decision to set up their own WAR facility, often at one of their own secondary sites, in order to save costs. However, experience indicates that this seldom works. Moving a large body of employees to an alternative site successfully is not easy, and the WAR needs constant management and investment to remain functional at the same level as the primary site. It also needs its own backup diesel generators, UPSes and water storage to ensure it is always operational, come what may.

All too often, in-sourced WARs are used to supply replacement equipment, which is often not replaced. That means in an emergency, vital equipment may be missing, thus compromising the organisation’s ability to recover.

“To ensure that your WAR is fit for purpose, and truly contributes to making your organisation resilient, best practice would be to outsource it to a specialist provider,” he concludes. “Resilience is key to sustainability in today’s world; make sure your organisation is truly resilient.”

ContinuitySA

ContinuitySA is Africa’s leading provider of business continuity management (BCM) and resilience services and has been helping the continent’s public and private organisations become more resilient for more than 30 years. Delivered by highly skilled experts, its fully managed services include ICT and cyber resilience, enterprise risk management, work area recovery and BCM advisory - all designed to enhance business resilience in an age of escalating threat. By helping clients understand their risk profile, and then develop an appropriate risk-mitigation strategy, including the ability to recover swiftly from a disaster, ContinuitySA provides peace of mind for all stakeholders.

ContinuitySA operates the continent’s biggest network of recovery centres, with more than 20 000m2 of space in Gauteng (Midrand and Randburg), the Western Cape (Tyger Valley), in Kwa-Zulu Natal (Mount Edgecombe) as well in Botswana, Mozambique, Kenya and Mauritius.

ContinuitySA is a Gold Partner of the Business Continuity Institute (BCI) and was inducted into the prestigious BCI Hall of Fame in 2016. It is also a Gold Partner of Veeam, a leading global provider of software enabling Disaster Recovery as a Service and Backup as a Service.

ContinuitySA. Our business is keeping you in business.

Additional information about ContinuitySA can be found at www.continuitysa.com. Network with ContinuitySA on Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

Editorial contacts
Rebecca Warsop (083) 252 9347 rebeccaw@warstreet.co.za
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